Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Appropriateness of Corporate Organizational Structure

In response to a post by Ray Podder, I rehash the frustration with educated elites' lack of situational awareness regarding the basic nature of capitalist corporate organizational systems.

To Ray:

The reason these (your) questions arise the way they do is because of the spectacular success of corporate propaganda.

Top-down authoritarian dominance (called "leadership" in MBA grad school), exploitation (minimizing cost), deceit and manipulation for profit (marketing), enforced scarcity (maximizing price), and unrestrained growth (increased market-share) are encoded in the corporate DNA - but with clever spin and massive investment in school textbook content, and outright ownership of text and mainstream media production, it is frighteningly easy to conceal such otherwise obvious truths. The amoral, predatory nature of capitalism - especially in the modern multinational corporate species - is one of those obvious truths recognized in the business community as vital to obscure. Others include the total societal costs of the profits appearing in corporate ledgers and in executive bank accounts, which are often paid in ignorance, misery, reduced democracy, and unfortunately all too often: in blood - including the deaths of children, and others who are "competitively weak". Huge public relations and lobbying industry segments are devoted to the "never-ending battle" to "sell" the "right view" of big business as overwhelmingly beneficial, but without alternative whenever the crimes are horrific and incontrovertible.

As an entire class of powerful entities acts consistently in breaking our oldest moral laws prohibiting the strong from preying upon the weak, asking whether "the corporate structure really makes sense for how people actually work?" is a crushing indictment of our educational systems' failure to prepare reasoned, objective situational assessments by the educated classes. Core problems remain invisible, while debate of minutiae provides a facade of choice and intellectual freedom.

The underlying assumption in your post is that self-interest in acquisitive terms of what is best for one's self, "moving ahead", "getting", etc., are assumed to be shared virtues, whether everyone would consider these good goals is beyond question. Such concept framing and newspeak hinders realization and expression of our natural desire to be loved, of value through contribution and service, leaving a better world for others rather than seeking opportunities to extract maximally from people and situations as dictated by "rational economic behavior". The parallels to religious doctrine and the cognitive crippling of followers warrant our cautious study and careful decision making.

My 2 cents...

See also: http://structureddream.blogspot.com/2009/03/poor-cubicle-rich-life.html

No comments:

Aspen Music Festival: Music with a View Concert

Distinguished theory and performance teacher provides expert knowledge during " Music with a View "at the Aspen Art Museum